Sunday Salon: What’s Your Story?

sunday salon

Time: // 7: 37 a.m.

The scene: // ALL of my kids are up right now. It’s Sunday and they act as though it’s a school day! I was hoping to get some work done this morning. It’s going to be harder to do now, but still doable. The kids and I have been passing a cold back and forth to each other for over a week. Now it’s my turn again and I’m hoping not to give it to the baby. There’s nothing more stressful or sadder than a sick newborn.

Eating and drinking: // keeping with Sunday tradition, I’m making stacks of pancakes later. For now, I’m drinking my second cup of coffee.

Reading: // I finished Beastly Bones, the second Jackaby book. I enjoyed it more than the first book. The series is just what I needed to get out of a reading funk. Now I have to try and patiently wait for the next book.

Thinking about: // stories again. A few months ago, I read an interesting New York Times article about the narratives we tell ourselves about our lives. The stories we internalize about ourselves is so important and shows just which events we include and exclude about the past.

My daughter, along with many of the teens in our neighbor, had a few mishaps this summer. One of her recent assignments was to write an autobiographical narrative. The story she wrote excludes a lot of her accomplishments – almost all of them – and includes the recent failures and mistakes she’s made. The narrative that’s going through her head is one in which she’s more of a villain. We’ve been talking about the story she’s telling herself and how to change it.

It made me think about my own narrative. I know bits and pieces of my story, but I’ve never stopped to think about what I’m saying to myself. It’s something I plan to explore in depth more.

Now I’m wondering: // what’s your story?

About Vasilly

Mother, daughter, sister, college student, bookworm, lover of chocolate and coffee.
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12 Responses to Sunday Salon: What’s Your Story?

  1. Michelle says:

    Great food for thought! My son’s cross-country coach was telling him just yesterday to stop reflecting on the negative and consider the positive as well. It is so easy to focus on the negative. Considering the positive is so important but one of the most difficult things anyone will do. I wonder why that is. How did we get to be this way from a sociological perspective? Genes? Culture?

  2. iliana says:

    Hope you are having a lovely Sunday and hope your cold goes away soon. I’m finally getting over mine. I’m looking forward to doing a bit of R.I.P. reading and maybe a nap.

  3. readerbuzz says:

    I love how you are helping your daughter rework her narrative. As we all should….

  4. What’s my story? Well…it all began in 1969, really, 1968…;) Okay, yes, it’s a loooonnnng story…

    Really, though, I do think it’s good to think of our stories and how we can change the narrative when it’s not going the way we think it should.

  5. It’s wonderful that you’re talking to your daughter about building a narrative that highlights her successes, not just her failures. She’s so lucky to have you. I admit that I tend to err on the side of remembering losses and forgetting wins myself, but I do try to reality-check myself on that. (she said, after a woeful week of job application & interviewing :p)

  6. BermudaOnion says:

    You’re so smart to help your daughter see the good things – we all need to do more of that.

  7. heidenkind says:

    I hope you feel better soon and the baby doesn’t catch cold!

    When I was in middle school we had to write our autobiography and it was super hard! It’s hard to get any perspective on yourself, not to mention your family and friends, especially when you’re young.

  8. Beth F says:

    Oh no on the family sickness. UGH. And, yes, it’s so hard to make our own story positive. We seem to focus on the negative.

  9. joyweesemoll says:

    I’ve realized recently that I’ve been telling myself an overly positive story, lately — that I’m being more productive than I really am. It keeps me from working on some problems with the way I live my daily life that I don’t seem to want to face.

  10. Rachel B says:

    It’s too bad your daughter remembered the bad stuff and not the good. Hopefully she’s not going through a stage of low self esteem. 😔 Adolescence is such a difficult time!

  11. Athira says:

    We all would do better to remember the good stuff. It is terrible that when we do something bad, the reminders for that bad incident end up being everywhere, though in part, that is also due to our mental setup. So awesome that you are helping her see the good things also.

  12. Belle Wong says:

    It’s definitely very hard to not focus on the negatives. Good for you for helping your daughter about how to change the story she’s been telling herself.

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