Weekend Cooking: Donuts!!

14618917My son, Oliver, begged me for weeks to make donuts. We’ve made cookies, cakes, and even cinnamon rolls before but never donuts. Last weekend, I reluctantly agreed. Oliver downloaded a sample of Jessica Segarra’s Mini Donuts: 100 Bite-Sized Donut Recipes to Sweeten Your “Hole” Day and went to work. Even though he’s only ten, he refused to let me help him. These donuts are so good, I couldn’t help but say “oh my God,” when I took my first bite.

Glazed Fried Mini Donut

            Yields 26 Mini Donuts and 26 Mini Donut Holes or 14 regular-sized donuts

Prep Time: 2 ½ hours  Cook time: 2-5 minutes

For Donuts

2 tablespoons warm water

1.25-ounce envelope fast-rise yeast

¾ cup warm whole milk

¼ cup granulated sugar

½ teaspoon salt

1 large egg

3 tablespoons shortening or lard

2 ½ cups all-purpose flour

Vegetable oil or peanut oil for frying

For Glaze

2 tablespoons whole milk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 ½ cups powdered sugar

1. In the bowl of your stand mixer, with the paddle attachment (or in a large bowl if you are going to knead the dough by hand), mix together warm water and yeast and let stand for 5 minutes.

2. Add milk, sugar, salt, egg, shortening, and 1 cup of flour. Mix on medium-low for 2 minutes, then switch to the dough hook. Slowly add the remaining 1 ½ cup of flour, ½ cup at a time. Once you have added all the flour, knead on medium for 2-3 minutes, until dough no longer sticks to the bowl. Turn up the speed to medium-high, and continue to knead dough for 3-4 minutes, until dough is smooth. [Keep some extra flour on hand in case you need it like we did.]

3. Transfer dough to a greased bowl, and cover with a slightly damp tea towel. Place bowl in a warm area (or in an oven preheated to 200˚F and then turn off) for about 1 hour. Dough is ready when it has doubled in size.

4. Transfer raised dough to a lightly floured surface, and carefully roll out until it is ½” thick. Cut out donuts with a floured 2” biscuit cutter, and then cut out the center of each donut with a floured 1” biscuit cutter.

5. Place donuts and donut holes on a lightly floured cookie sheet, and cover again with a slightly damp tea towel. Place in a warm area (or in an oven preheated to 200˚F and then turned off) for about 1 hour. Dough is ready when it has doubled in size.

6. Heat oil in a large, deep skillet or a deep fryer to 350˚F.

7. Once oil is hot, working with 4 to 6 donuts at a time, carefully drop donuts into oil. Fry for 1-2 minutes or until golden brown; flip each donut and fry the other side.

8. Remove and drain on a plate lined with paper towel or newspaper. Continue this process until each donut has been fried.

9. Place wax paper under a wire rack to collect any drippings for any easy cleanup. Then, in a small bowl, whisk together milk and vanilla extract. Add powdered sugar, whisking until smooth.

10. While the donuts are still warm, dip the top of each donut and donut hole into the glaze, transfer to a wire rack, and let set for 5 minutes. Serve immediately; donuts can be stored in an airtight container for up to 3 days but are best served fresh.

Note: Oliver didn’t like it the glaze, so we ended up dipping the warm donuts into cinnamon and sugar. We used 1 stick of melted butter, ½ cup of sugar and 1-2 teaspoons of cinnamon, dipping the donuts into the butter than the cinnamon and sugar mixture. We used a mason jar top to cut the donuts out and the tip of a piping bag (you know, the ones used for icing cakes) to make the donut holes.

About Vasilly

Mother, daughter, sister, college student, bookworm, lover of chocolate and coffee.
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14 Responses to Weekend Cooking: Donuts!!

  1. Yummy. Knowing how to make donuts is a skill I shouldn’t learn.

  2. The cover of this book is irresistible.

  3. I got a new book on donuts and then found two more at the library. I guess donuts are making a come-back. These look terrific. I’m impressed that your ten-year-old is doing them.

  4. BermudaOnion says:

    Wow! Oliver can come cook for me anytime he wants to!

  5. Beth F says:

    Ok, so if Oliver can do, I can too! For some reason, I always shy away from deep fat frying.

  6. kay says:

    Woah, this sounds extra yummy. Must try!😀

  7. Oooh, I want to try! My grandmother made “donuts” when I was growing up from biscuit dough (canned), fried and sprinkled with sugar. Simple, terrible for us, and delicious. lol These sound better, though.

  8. olduvai says:

    Yum! And how fantastic that he enjoys baking!

  9. heidenkind says:

    I am super impressed by Oliver’s cooking skills!

  10. Kristen M. says:

    I have been pinning donut recipes for ages now but haven’t made any. I really need to!

  11. dastevensish says:

    Gah–they sound so good!!! I like Oliver’s substitution to cinnamon-sugar coating. *salivating profusely*

  12. What. Have you considered that your son may be a culinary genius? Donuts have never seemed to me like a food a person could MAKE. And I think you made a very good decision to use a cinnamon-sugar coating rather than a glaze — sounds delicious.

    Incidentally, do you live in a region of the country where hot donuts come standard? Until I moved to New York, it never crossed my mind that anybody would buy donuts at a donut shop that weren’t hot. They’re only good when they’re hot!

    • Vasilly says:

      Living in Southern California, hot donuts are not the standard. I didn’t even KNOW you can get donuts hot! Gah!

      • Bree @The Things We Read says:

        Hot donuts are the best! Is Crispy Creme in SoCal? If so, when their hot sign in on it means they’ve finished a batch of donuts. Go in then. Melt in your mouth fantastic.

        I am in love with your son. Cooking on his own at 10? He is going to make a great husband some day.

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