Library Loot

Library Loot is one of my favorite weekly events hosted by Marg (The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader) and Claire (The Captive Reader). It’s a meme where bloggers share what they’ve recently checked out from the library. 

Today I went to the library just to pick up my holds, nothing else. But once I got there and let the kids loose, I had to browse the new arrivals. I came home with more books than I planned!

My stack:

brown cinnamon and gunpowderCinnamon and Gunpowder by Eli Brown. I heard about this book from Candace over at Beth Fish Reads. I pick it up as a “maybe” read: maybe I’ll get to it before the due date, maybe not. I started reading it and I haven’t been able to stop!

It’s 1819 and Owen Wedgewood a.k.a. The King of Sauces has just been kidnapped by Captain Mad Hannah Mabbot. Mabbot wants Owen to cook her own delicious meal every Sunday if he wants to live. The only rules is that he doesn’t serve her anything disappointing. If he does, he’ll be sent home in pieces. I’m loving Mad Hannah already.

baxter the long warThe Long War by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter. I picked this up because I read the first book in the series, The Long Earth, and loved it. The Long War is set a decade after the first book but with the same characters. I can’t wait to start reading it.

lanagan yellowcake

Yellowcake: Stories by Margo Lanagan. I started reading this book earlier this year but my copy expired. The first book in the collection, “The Point of Roses”, was just so well-written that I had to read it twice. I have high hopes for the rest of the stories.

lambin

An Ecology of Happiness by Eric Lambin. Translated by Teresa Lavender Fagan. This title makes me think of Deb (Readerbuzz) so I had to pick it up.

loewenGaining Daylight: Life on Two Islands by Sara Loewen. Picked it up because of the cover but I do love essays.

kaufmanUngifted:Intelligence Redefined by Scott Barry Kaufman. I love reading books about creativity, intelligence, and talent so it was easy to add this book to the stack. There has been so many books published about the same subject matter, I hope this book has something to add to the conversation.

What have you picked up from the library lately?

About these ads

22 thoughts on “Library Loot

  1. I say that a lot. I’m just going to pick up what I have on hold. Then I wind up browsing the stacks anyway. Love the cover of Gaining Daylight. Enjoy!

  2. There’s no point in even pretending to have willpower once one walks into the library, is there? :) I totally would have grabbed Gaining Daylight after seeing that cover too! Hope you love them all!

  3. I’m quite intrigued by the Ungifted book and redefining intelligence. As a teacher of about a bajillion years and a mother of a son who hated school, I think we aren’t meeting the needs of many children today. I try, believe me, and I think almost the best thing I can do is strengthen each child’s unique gifts in every way I can.

  4. Looks like everyone seems to have this problem of browsing the new arrivals when they go to pick up holds. I don’t have that issue with the rack for holds down near the kids room…but there is that shelf of for sale donated books that I often cannot resist.

  5. I picked up Cinnamon and Gunpowder from the library, too! I agree that it’s a “maybe” book. Sounds a little guy-centric, but we’ll see.

  6. I love essays too, so make sure to tell us what you think of Gaining Daylight! My most recent library find was Jennifer Finney Boylan’s new book, which is turning out to be so wonderful and moving I can’t hardly take it. She’s such a good writer, I don’t know why I don’t own everything she’s written.

  7. “I came home with more books than I planned!” <~~ Ha ha ;) Typical right??

    I'm super curious about Cinnamon, can't wait to hear what you think!

  8. None of these books is on my TBR, but every single one of them looks interesting enough for me to have snapped it off the library shelf as well. Hope you find some gems in here!

  9. I agree completely with Bellezza’s comment above. When we narrowly define standards of success and failure for children, we create a stratified education system that diminishes possibility for kids especially our dreamiest little lovies and those who require different access points to education. I’d be interested to read that one too.

  10. So much goodness here! I totally want to read Cinnamon and Gunpowder. I already did, but the overwhelming urge is getting…well…overwhelming! I also need to step it up and read some of Lanagan’s work. I have Brides of Rollrock Island on my reader, but Yellowcake sounds amazing, too.

Comments are closed.